The King’s Preacher

          On a bright and sunny day, April 18, 2008, my son Bobby Ricketts and I set out for the upper branches of the Banister River in search of the old colonial parson’s house.  Seldom are we so successful.  After doing our paperwork, research, and talking with a life-long resident of the area, Bobby and I walked a quarter or half mile to the foundation of the old glebe house.        

We believe that this rubble of large rocks is what remains of the chimney for the Glebe house.  This view is looking east.  The foundation rocks can be seen in the grass.  The rocks are in the center of the western wall.  I am standing at the southeast corner of the foundation.  This is a beautiful homesite:  The cemetery site is west from the Glebe house site:

Old Glebe Tract Cemetery

                            Our first view of the old Glebe tract cemetery           In the eighteenth century, the glebe was a working farm and residence of the Anglican minister for the Church of England, back when Virginia was only a colony of the King of England.  Separate taxes were imposed on residents for the operation of the church and to supporting orphans, widows and those unable to care for themselves.  Tithes were assessed on free White males, African male slaves, and Native American servants, both male and female, who were sixteen years and older.  Adult White women were only considered tithables when they were head of a household. Click here for more:

          In 1661, Virginia passed a law which established the minister’s salary at 80 pounds a year.  An act in the year 1696 set the salary at 16,000 pounds of tobacco “besides his prerequisites.”  In order to obtain educated and qualified ministers, the General Assembly required each parish, which usually corresponded to county lines, to provide a suitable house and land for the parson’s use.  In 1748, the minimum size of the glebe land was to be 200 acres, but most parishes were proud to provide much more land for their parson.  The law required “a convenient mansion house, kitchen, barn, stable, dairy, meat house, corn house, and garden “well paled or enclosed with mud walls.”

          Rev. Alexander Gordon became the Halifax County (which then included Pittsylvania County) Anglican minister in 1762.  After 1767, when Pittsylvania was taken from western Halifax County, it was several years before the county had its own minister. “Readers” were appointed to lead the worship services for some communities.
          At a meeting in February 1768 at Pittsylvania Courthouse (which is now called Callands), a committee was directed “to view a good and convenient lands for a glebe.”  At the next meeting, in March 1768, the Rev. Alexander Gordon of Halifax agreed to preach in Camden Parish (the parish lines were usually the same as the county) of Pittsylvania County for 16,000 pounds of tobacco.  The tobacco was levied for his salary to preach at Abraham Shelton’s near Chalk Level, at Potter’s Creek Meeting House at Toshes, at Snow Creek Chapel at Van Bibber’s, at Peter Copeland’s house (now Henry Co.), Harmon Critz’s house (now Patrick Co.) and at Edward Smith’s house. 
          At that same meeting, Rev. James Stevenson applied for the position.  The court stated that “A title of orders for this parish was received and the church wardens were ordered to certify the same with the Bishop of London.”  James Stevenson agreed that the vestry would be at liberty to choose another clergyman after his return from London if they did not approve of him.  Stevenson returned from London with his license and was received by the vestry on 14 July 1769.  The vestry then ordered four churches and two chapels for Camden Parish:

(1) A bid was ordered on a church near Thomas Mustain’s house, to be 24 feet by 31 feet, framed with a clap board roof with a 12-foot pitch, plank floor, with a pulpit and desk, two doors, five windows, with a small table and benches inside.
(2) A bid was ordered on a church near Samuel Harris house on Fall Creek.  (This order was rescinded when Harris became an early convert to the Baptist faith).
(3) A new church was ordered at Snow Creek (now Franklin Co.).
(4) A church at “Road Ford” of Leatherwood Creek (now Henry Co.).
(5) A “Chapel of Ease” near John Wilcox place was to be 24 feet by 20 feet of round logs.
(6) A “Chapel of Ease” near Harmon Critz hosue (now Patrick Co.)
          In 1771, Rev. Stevenson moved to be the Rector of Berkeley Parish in Spotsylvania Co., Virginia and the Rev. Lewis Guilliam replaced him as minister of Camden Parrish of Pittsylvania Co.  Guilliam was a Scotsman who never married.  Because the glebe had not been established, he boarded with John Pigg.  His board of 340 pounds of tobacco a month for housing the minister, in addition to his 16,000 pound salary, was paid by the vestry. 
          The Rev. Guilliam seemed to be a poor example of what he was employed to teach.  He was said to have been “guilty of such unsavory conduct as to bring shame upon both himself and his calling….Shame and contempt covered his whole life.”  “He was continually involved in petty lawsuits in which he was invariable the loser.”  Nothing in his favor seems to have been written.  Guilliam would have resided on the Glebe tract four miles southeast of the courthouse. 
          On the 28th day of May “Year of our Lord Christ 1773, the 13th year of our sovereign King George III,” the vestry paid 160 pounds for 588 acres for use of a glebe.  The vestry expended another 58,000 pounds to build a mansion house and out buildings for the parson’s use. 
          The large tract was part of a much larger tract of 2,543 acres which Col. Richard Chamberlain had received in 1760.  He added to this tract making the total acreage 3,450:
Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

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Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

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(1) A bid was ordered on a church near Thomas Mustain’s house, to be 24 feet by 31 feet, framed with a clap board roof with a 12-foot pitch, plank floor, with a pulpit and desk, two doors, five windows, with a small table and benches inside.
(2) A bid was ordered on a church near Samuel Harris house on Fall Creek.  (This order was rescinded when Harris became an early convert to the Baptist faith).
(3) A new church was ordered at Snow Creek (now Franklin Co.).
(4) A church at “Road Ford” of Leatherwood Creek (now Henry Co.).
(5) A “Chapel of Ease” near John Wilcox place was to be 24 feet by 20 feet of round logs.
(6) A “Chapel of Ease” near Harmon Critz hosue (now Patrick Co.)
          In 1771, Rev. Stevenson moved to be the Rector of Berkeley Parish in Spotsylvania Co., Virginia and the Rev. Lewis Guilliam replaced him as minister of Camden Parrish of Pittsylvania Co.  Guilliam was a Scotsman who never married.  Because the glebe had not been established, he boarded with John Pigg.  His board of 340 pounds of tobacco a month for housing the minister, in addition to his 16,000 pound salary, was paid by the vestry. 
          The Rev. Guilliam seemed to be a poor example of what he was employed to teach.  He was said to have been “guilty of such unsavory conduct as to bring shame upon both himself and his calling….Shame and contempt covered his whole life.”  “He was continually involved in petty lawsuits in which he was invariable the loser.”  Nothing in his favor seems to have been written.  Guilliam would have resided on the Glebe tract four miles southeast of the courthouse. 
          On the 28th day of May “Year of our Lord Christ 1773, the 13th year of our sovereign King George III,” the vestry paid 160 pounds for 588 acres for use of a glebe.  The vestry expended another 58,000 pounds to build a mansion house and out buildings for the parson’s use. 
          The large tract was part of a much larger tract of 2,543 acres which Col. Richard Chamberlain had received in 1760.  He added to this tract making the total acreage 3,450:
Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

Take a look at our websites:

Take a look at our websites: http://rdricketts.com or  http://beaversmill.ieasysite.com/

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

Take a look at our websites:

Take a look at our websites: http://rdricketts.com or  http://beaversmill.ieasysite.com/

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Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

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       In 1661, Virginia passed a law which established the minister’s salary at 80 pounds a year.  An act in the year 1696 set the salary at 16,000 pounds of tobacco “besides his prerequisites.”  In order to obtain educated and qualified ministers, the General Assembly required each parish, which usually corresponded to county lines, to provide a suitable house and land for the parson’s use.  In 1748, the minimum size of the glebe land was to be 200 acres, but most parishes were proud to provide much more land for their parson.  The law required “a convenient mansion house, kitchen, barn, stable, dairy, meat house, corn house, and garden “well paled or enclosed with mud walls.”

          Rev. Alexander Gordon became the Halifax County (which then included Pittsylvania County) Anglican minister in 1762.  After 1767, when Pittsylvania was taken from western Halifax County, it was several years before the county had its own minister. “Readers” were appointed to lead the worship services for some communities.
          At a meeting in February 1768 at Pittsylvania Courthouse (which is now called Callands), a committee was directed “to view a good and convenient lands for a glebe.”  At the next meeting, in March 1768, the Rev. Alexander Gordon of Halifax agreed to preach in Camden Parish (the parish lines were usually the same as the county) of Pittsylvania County for 16,000 pounds of tobacco.  The tobacco was levied for his salary to preach at Abraham Shelton’s near Chalk Level, at Potter’s Creek Meeting House at Toshes, at Snow Creek Chapel at Van Bibber’s, at Peter Copeland’s house (now Henry Co.), Harmon Critz’s house (now Patrick Co.) and at Edward Smith’s house. 
          At that same meeting, Rev. James Stevenson applied for the position.  The court stated that “A title of orders for this parish was received and the church wardens were ordered to certify the same with the Bishop of London.”  James Stevenson agreed that the vestry would be at liberty to choose another clergyman after his return from London if they did not approve of him.  Stevenson returned from London with his license and was received by the vestry on 14 July 1769.  The vestry then ordered four churches and two chapels for Camden Parish:

(1) A bid was ordered on a church near Thomas Mustain’s house, to be 24 feet by 31 feet, framed with a clap board roof with a 12-foot pitch, plank floor, with a pulpit and desk, two doors, five windows, with a small table and benches inside.
(2) A bid was ordered on a church near Samuel Harris house on Fall Creek.  (This order was rescinded when Harris became an early convert to the Baptist faith).
(3) A new church was ordered at Snow Creek (now Franklin Co.).
(4) A church at “Road Ford” of Leatherwood Creek (now Henry Co.).
(5) A “Chapel of Ease” near John Wilcox place was to be 24 feet by 20 feet of round logs.
(6) A “Chapel of Ease” near Harmon Critz hosue (now Patrick Co.)
          In 1771, Rev. Stevenson moved to be the Rector of Berkeley Parish in Spotsylvania Co., Virginia and the Rev. Lewis Guilliam replaced him as minister of Camden Parrish of Pittsylvania Co.  Guilliam was a Scotsman who never married.  Because the glebe had not been established, he boarded with John Pigg.  His board of 340 pounds of tobacco a month for housing the minister, in addition to his 16,000 pound salary, was paid by the vestry. 
          The Rev. Guilliam seemed to be a poor example of what he was employed to teach.  He was said to have been “guilty of such unsavory conduct as to bring shame upon both himself and his calling….Shame and contempt covered his whole life.”  “He was continually involved in petty lawsuits in which he was invariable the loser.”  Nothing in his favor seems to have been written.  Guilliam would have resided on the Glebe tract four miles southeast of the courthouse. 
          On the 28th day of May “Year of our Lord Christ 1773, the 13th year of our sovereign King George III,” the vestry paid 160 pounds for 588 acres for use of a glebe.  The vestry expended another 58,000 pounds to build a mansion house and out buildings for the parson’s use. 
          The large tract was part of a much larger tract of 2,543 acres which Col. Richard Chamberlain had received in 1760.  He added to this tract making the total acreage 3,450:
Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

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Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

Take a look at our websites:

Take a look at our websites: http://rdricketts.com or  http://beaversmill.ieasysite.com/

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

Take a look at our websites:

Take a look at our websites: http://rdricketts.com or  http://beaversmill.ieasysite.com/

Take a look at our websites:  or  

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(1) A bid was ordered on a church near Thomas Mustain’s house, to be 24 feet by 31 feet, framed with a clap board roof with a 12-foot pitch, plank floor, with a pulpit and desk, two doors, five windows, with a small table and benches inside.
(2) A bid was ordered on a church near Samuel Harris house on Fall Creek.  (This order was rescinded when Harris became an early convert to the Baptist faith).
(3) A new church was ordered at Snow Creek (now Franklin Co.).
(4) A church at “Road Ford” of Leatherwood Creek (now Henry Co.).
(5) A “Chapel of Ease” near John Wilcox place was to be 24 feet by 20 feet of round logs.
(6) A “Chapel of Ease” near Harmon Critz hosue (now Patrick Co.)
          In 1771, Rev. Stevenson moved to be the Rector of Berkeley Parish in Spotsylvania Co., Virginia and the Rev. Lewis Guilliam replaced him as minister of Camden Parrish of Pittsylvania Co.  Guilliam was a Scotsman who never married.  Because the glebe had not been established, he boarded with John Pigg.  His board of 340 pounds of tobacco a month for housing the minister, in addition to his 16,000 pound salary, was paid by the vestry. 
          The Rev. Guilliam seemed to be a poor example of what he was employed to teach.  He was said to have been “guilty of such unsavory conduct as to bring shame upon both himself and his calling….Shame and contempt covered his whole life.”  “He was continually involved in petty lawsuits in which he was invariable the loser.”  Nothing in his favor seems to have been written.  Guilliam would have resided on the Glebe tract four miles southeast of the courthouse. 
          On the 28th day of May “Year of our Lord Christ 1773, the 13th year of our sovereign King George III,” the vestry paid 160 pounds for 588 acres for use of a glebe.  The vestry expended another 58,000 pounds to build a mansion house and out buildings for the parson’s use. 
          The large tract was part of a much larger tract of 2,543 acres which Col. Richard Chamberlain had received in 1760.  He added to this tract making the total acreage 3,450:
Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

Take a look at our websites:

Take a look at our websites: http://rdricketts.com or  http://beaversmill.ieasysite.com/

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Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

Take a look at our websites:

Take a look at our websites: http://rdricketts.com or  http://beaversmill.ieasysite.com/

Take a look at our websites:  or  

Take a look at our websites:  or  

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

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        In the eighteenth century, the glebe was a working farm and residence of the Anglican minister for the Church of England, back when Virginia was only a colony of the King of England.  Separate taxes were imposed on residents for the operation of the church and to supporting orphans, widows and those unable to care for themselves.  Tithes were assessed on free White males, African male slaves, and Native American servants, both male and female, who were sixteen years and older.  Adult White women were only considered tithables when they were head of a household. Click here for more:

          In 1661, Virginia passed a law which established the minister’s salary at 80 pounds a year.  An act in the year 1696 set the salary at 16,000 pounds of tobacco “besides his prerequisites.”  In order to obtain educated and qualified ministers, the General Assembly required each parish, which usually corresponded to county lines, to provide a suitable house and land for the parson’s use.  In 1748, the minimum size of the glebe land was to be 200 acres, but most parishes were proud to provide much more land for their parson.  The law required “a convenient mansion house, kitchen, barn, stable, dairy, meat house, corn house, and garden “well paled or enclosed with mud walls.”

          Rev. Alexander Gordon became the Halifax County (which then included Pittsylvania County) Anglican minister in 1762.  After 1767, when Pittsylvania was taken from western Halifax County, it was several years before the county had its own minister. “Readers” were appointed to lead the worship services for some communities.
          At a meeting in February 1768 at Pittsylvania Courthouse (which is now called Callands), a committee was directed “to view a good and convenient lands for a glebe.”  At the next meeting, in March 1768, the Rev. Alexander Gordon of Halifax agreed to preach in Camden Parish (the parish lines were usually the same as the county) of Pittsylvania County for 16,000 pounds of tobacco.  The tobacco was levied for his salary to preach at Abraham Shelton’s near Chalk Level, at Potter’s Creek Meeting House at Toshes, at Snow Creek Chapel at Van Bibber’s, at Peter Copeland’s house (now Henry Co.), Harmon Critz’s house (now Patrick Co.) and at Edward Smith’s house. 
          At that same meeting, Rev. James Stevenson applied for the position.  The court stated that “A title of orders for this parish was received and the church wardens were ordered to certify the same with the Bishop of London.”  James Stevenson agreed that the vestry would be at liberty to choose another clergyman after his return from London if they did not approve of him.  Stevenson returned from London with his license and was received by the vestry on 14 July 1769.  The vestry then ordered four churches and two chapels for Camden Parish:

(1) A bid was ordered on a church near Thomas Mustain’s house, to be 24 feet by 31 feet, framed with a clap board roof with a 12-foot pitch, plank floor, with a pulpit and desk, two doors, five windows, with a small table and benches inside.
(2) A bid was ordered on a church near Samuel Harris house on Fall Creek.  (This order was rescinded when Harris became an early convert to the Baptist faith).
(3) A new church was ordered at Snow Creek (now Franklin Co.).
(4) A church at “Road Ford” of Leatherwood Creek (now Henry Co.).
(5) A “Chapel of Ease” near John Wilcox place was to be 24 feet by 20 feet of round logs.
(6) A “Chapel of Ease” near Harmon Critz hosue (now Patrick Co.)
          In 1771, Rev. Stevenson moved to be the Rector of Berkeley Parish in Spotsylvania Co., Virginia and the Rev. Lewis Guilliam replaced him as minister of Camden Parrish of Pittsylvania Co.  Guilliam was a Scotsman who never married.  Because the glebe had not been established, he boarded with John Pigg.  His board of 340 pounds of tobacco a month for housing the minister, in addition to his 16,000 pound salary, was paid by the vestry. 
          The Rev. Guilliam seemed to be a poor example of what he was employed to teach.  He was said to have been “guilty of such unsavory conduct as to bring shame upon both himself and his calling….Shame and contempt covered his whole life.”  “He was continually involved in petty lawsuits in which he was invariable the loser.”  Nothing in his favor seems to have been written.  Guilliam would have resided on the Glebe tract four miles southeast of the courthouse. 
          On the 28th day of May “Year of our Lord Christ 1773, the 13th year of our sovereign King George III,” the vestry paid 160 pounds for 588 acres for use of a glebe.  The vestry expended another 58,000 pounds to build a mansion house and out buildings for the parson’s use. 
          The large tract was part of a much larger tract of 2,543 acres which Col. Richard Chamberlain had received in 1760.  He added to this tract making the total acreage 3,450:
Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

Take a look at our websites:

Take a look at our websites: http://rdricketts.com or  http://beaversmill.ieasysite.com/

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Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

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(1) A bid was ordered on a church near Thomas Mustain’s house, to be 24 feet by 31 feet, framed with a clap board roof with a 12-foot pitch, plank floor, with a pulpit and desk, two doors, five windows, with a small table and benches inside.
(2) A bid was ordered on a church near Samuel Harris house on Fall Creek.  (This order was rescinded when Harris became an early convert to the Baptist faith).
(3) A new church was ordered at Snow Creek (now Franklin Co.).
(4) A church at “Road Ford” of Leatherwood Creek (now Henry Co.).
(5) A “Chapel of Ease” near John Wilcox place was to be 24 feet by 20 feet of round logs.
(6) A “Chapel of Ease” near Harmon Critz hosue (now Patrick Co.)
          In 1771, Rev. Stevenson moved to be the Rector of Berkeley Parish in Spotsylvania Co., Virginia and the Rev. Lewis Guilliam replaced him as minister of Camden Parrish of Pittsylvania Co.  Guilliam was a Scotsman who never married.  Because the glebe had not been established, he boarded with John Pigg.  His board of 340 pounds of tobacco a month for housing the minister, in addition to his 16,000 pound salary, was paid by the vestry. 
          The Rev. Guilliam seemed to be a poor example of what he was employed to teach.  He was said to have been “guilty of such unsavory conduct as to bring shame upon both himself and his calling….Shame and contempt covered his whole life.”  “He was continually involved in petty lawsuits in which he was invariable the loser.”  Nothing in his favor seems to have been written.  Guilliam would have resided on the Glebe tract four miles southeast of the courthouse. 
          On the 28th day of May “Year of our Lord Christ 1773, the 13th year of our sovereign King George III,” the vestry paid 160 pounds for 588 acres for use of a glebe.  The vestry expended another 58,000 pounds to build a mansion house and out buildings for the parson’s use. 
          The large tract was part of a much larger tract of 2,543 acres which Col. Richard Chamberlain had received in 1760.  He added to this tract making the total acreage 3,450:
Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

Take a look at our websites:

Take a look at our websites: http://rdricketts.com or  http://beaversmill.ieasysite.com/

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

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Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

Take a look at our websites:

Take a look at our websites: http://rdricketts.com or  http://beaversmill.ieasysite.com/

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       In 1661, Virginia passed a law which established the minister’s salary at 80 pounds a year.  An act in the year 1696 set the salary at 16,000 pounds of tobacco “besides his prerequisites.”  In order to obtain educated and qualified ministers, the General Assembly required each parish, which usually corresponded to county lines, to provide a suitable house and land for the parson’s use.  In 1748, the minimum size of the glebe land was to be 200 acres, but most parishes were proud to provide much more land for their parson.  The law required “a convenient mansion house, kitchen, barn, stable, dairy, meat house, corn house, and garden “well paled or enclosed with mud walls.”

          Rev. Alexander Gordon became the Halifax County (which then included Pittsylvania County) Anglican minister in 1762.  After 1767, when Pittsylvania was taken from western Halifax County, it was several years before the county had its own minister. “Readers” were appointed to lead the worship services for some communities.
          At a meeting in February 1768 at Pittsylvania Courthouse (which is now called Callands), a committee was directed “to view a good and convenient lands for a glebe.”  At the next meeting, in March 1768, the Rev. Alexander Gordon of Halifax agreed to preach in Camden Parish (the parish lines were usually the same as the county) of Pittsylvania County for 16,000 pounds of tobacco.  The tobacco was levied for his salary to preach at Abraham Shelton’s near Chalk Level, at Potter’s Creek Meeting House at Toshes, at Snow Creek Chapel at Van Bibber’s, at Peter Copeland’s house (now Henry Co.), Harmon Critz’s house (now Patrick Co.) and at Edward Smith’s house. 
          At that same meeting, Rev. James Stevenson applied for the position.  The court stated that “A title of orders for this parish was received and the church wardens were ordered to certify the same with the Bishop of London.”  James Stevenson agreed that the vestry would be at liberty to choose another clergyman after his return from London if they did not approve of him.  Stevenson returned from London with his license and was received by the vestry on 14 July 1769.  The vestry then ordered four churches and two chapels for Camden Parish:

(1) A bid was ordered on a church near Thomas Mustain’s house, to be 24 feet by 31 feet, framed with a clap board roof with a 12-foot pitch, plank floor, with a pulpit and desk, two doors, five windows, with a small table and benches inside.
(2) A bid was ordered on a church near Samuel Harris house on Fall Creek.  (This order was rescinded when Harris became an early convert to the Baptist faith).
(3) A new church was ordered at Snow Creek (now Franklin Co.).
(4) A church at “Road Ford” of Leatherwood Creek (now Henry Co.).
(5) A “Chapel of Ease” near John Wilcox place was to be 24 feet by 20 feet of round logs.
(6) A “Chapel of Ease” near Harmon Critz hosue (now Patrick Co.)
          In 1771, Rev. Stevenson moved to be the Rector of Berkeley Parish in Spotsylvania Co., Virginia and the Rev. Lewis Guilliam replaced him as minister of Camden Parrish of Pittsylvania Co.  Guilliam was a Scotsman who never married.  Because the glebe had not been established, he boarded with John Pigg.  His board of 340 pounds of tobacco a month for housing the minister, in addition to his 16,000 pound salary, was paid by the vestry. 
          The Rev. Guilliam seemed to be a poor example of what he was employed to teach.  He was said to have been “guilty of such unsavory conduct as to bring shame upon both himself and his calling….Shame and contempt covered his whole life.”  “He was continually involved in petty lawsuits in which he was invariable the loser.”  Nothing in his favor seems to have been written.  Guilliam would have resided on the Glebe tract four miles southeast of the courthouse. 
          On the 28th day of May “Year of our Lord Christ 1773, the 13th year of our sovereign King George III,” the vestry paid 160 pounds for 588 acres for use of a glebe.  The vestry expended another 58,000 pounds to build a mansion house and out buildings for the parson’s use. 
          The large tract was part of a much larger tract of 2,543 acres which Col. Richard Chamberlain had received in 1760.  He added to this tract making the total acreage 3,450:
Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

Take a look at our websites:

Take a look at our websites: http://rdricketts.com or  http://beaversmill.ieasysite.com/

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Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

Take a look at our websites:

Take a look at our websites: http://rdricketts.com or  http://beaversmill.ieasysite.com/

Take a look at our websites:  or  

Take a look at our websites:  or  

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

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(1) A bid was ordered on a church near Thomas Mustain’s house, to be 24 feet by 31 feet, framed with a clap board roof with a 12-foot pitch, plank floor, with a pulpit and desk, two doors, five windows, with a small table and benches inside.
(2) A bid was ordered on a church near Samuel Harris house on Fall Creek.  (This order was rescinded when Harris became an early convert to the Baptist faith).
(3) A new church was ordered at Snow Creek (now Franklin Co.).
(4) A church at “Road Ford” of Leatherwood Creek (now Henry Co.).
(5) A “Chapel of Ease” near John Wilcox place was to be 24 feet by 20 feet of round logs.
(6) A “Chapel of Ease” near Harmon Critz hosue (now Patrick Co.)
          In 1771, Rev. Stevenson moved to be the Rector of Berkeley Parish in Spotsylvania Co., Virginia and the Rev. Lewis Guilliam replaced him as minister of Camden Parrish of Pittsylvania Co.  Guilliam was a Scotsman who never married.  Because the glebe had not been established, he boarded with John Pigg.  His board of 340 pounds of tobacco a month for housing the minister, in addition to his 16,000 pound salary, was paid by the vestry. 
          The Rev. Guilliam seemed to be a poor example of what he was employed to teach.  He was said to have been “guilty of such unsavory conduct as to bring shame upon both himself and his calling….Shame and contempt covered his whole life.”  “He was continually involved in petty lawsuits in which he was invariable the loser.”  Nothing in his favor seems to have been written.  Guilliam would have resided on the Glebe tract four miles southeast of the courthouse. 
          On the 28th day of May “Year of our Lord Christ 1773, the 13th year of our sovereign King George III,” the vestry paid 160 pounds for 588 acres for use of a glebe.  The vestry expended another 58,000 pounds to build a mansion house and out buildings for the parson’s use. 
          The large tract was part of a much larger tract of 2,543 acres which Col. Richard Chamberlain had received in 1760.  He added to this tract making the total acreage 3,450:
Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

See blog indes at:   http://rdricketts.com/blog/

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Col. Chamberlayne’s claim to fame might be that of a matchmaker.  Chamberlain, of St. Peters Parish in New Kent County, Virginia, operated a ferry across the Pamunkey River at his Poplar Grove Plantation.  Daniel Parke Custis and his wife, the former Martha Dandridge, lived on the adjacent “White House Plantation,” east of Chamberlain.  In July of 1757, Custis died suddenly, leaving Martha a 25-year-old widow with two young children.  The next year, Chamberlain introduced his overnight guest, Col. George Washington, to his wealthy next-door widow.  Future president George Washington and Martha were married in the White House Plantation House on January 6, 1759.  You might say that George Washington was the first president who married in the White House. The Yankees came and burned the fine old house in 1862, by mistake, so they say. 

          Ironically, on the 16th day of January 1775, when the freeholders of Pittsylvania Co. convened at the Courthouse and chose a committee “for enforcing and putting into execution the Association,” the Rev’d Lewis Guilliam was on that committee.  “All the inhabitants of the county then present, which were very numerous, seemed determined and resolute in defending their liberties and properties, at the risk of their lives, and if required to die by their follow suffers, (the Bostonians) whose cause they consider their own… The committee rose, and several loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the company dispersed, well pleased with the behavior of those people that they had put their confidence in. 
          Residents were required to sign an oath of allegiance to the newly independent colony of Virginia.  Our Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.  Just days later, on July 22, 1776, the committee met and were informed that (1) George Herndon (2) George Murdock (3) John Mack (4) Samuel Calland (5) Zachariah Sneed (6) William Mitchell and (7) Archibald Smith “are suspected to be enemies to the rights and liberties of America, they having appeared before this committee agreeable to a citation, refused to take the oath prescribed by the General Convention…”  There could be no neutral parties.  Those who refused to support the independence movement and denounce the king were asked to forfeit their property and leave the colony.  The king threatened to hang those who sought to be free of English control.
          Apparently, the Rev. Guilliam had second thoughts when it came time to sign his name at the risk of his life.  He, along with Samuel Calland, was ordered to appear before the court on February 5, 1777 to answer “Why they do not depart the colony, they being natives of Great Britain.”  Apparently, Guilliam left the area, but Samuel Calland was excused since he had “married a national of this country.” The wedding with Elizabeth Smith took place on December 14, 1776. Calland eventually signed the oath and continued to operate his store at the courthouse.  Samuel Calland is said to have owned a total of over 3,000 aces of land, 24 horses, and 74 slaves. 
          During the Revolutionary War, the county seized the glebe land and sold it for cash to go into the public funds.  In 1779, commissioners sold the 588-acre glebe land and buildings to Epaphroditus White, brother of Dr. Rawley White of Peytonsburg, for 5,150 pounds.  Even with inflation caused by the war, this is a very expensive purchase.  No doubt, the large mansion house with outbuilding made the property valuable.  The land was relatively level for this area and contained choice farm land.   
          By January 19, 1785, Epaphroditus (Epa) White had died.  His widow, the former Tabitha Spraggins probably moved back to Halifax County near her father Thomas Spraggins, who operated a store and ordinary in Peytonsburg, the old Halifax County courthouse town.  Her brother Melchizedeck Spraggins purchased the glebe land in 1797.  Spraggins sold the land to Samuel Calland in 1804.  The tract was then 593 acres (more or less; it was probably the same 588 acres) on both sides of the Banister River and known by the name of the Pittsylvania Old Glebe “being land Epa White died possessed and on which he died.”  Most of the deeds state that one property line crossed Hickey’s Road twice.  Hickey’s Road (now SR 612) was well-traveled in the 1740s and led from the James River to John Hickey’s Store near the line between Henry and Franklin Counties near the present community of Henry.  SR 750, which was an early north/south road is just east of the glebe property.  The intersection of these roads is known as Banister.  The tract’s location near two major county roads also added to its value.  There were no towns as we know them at this time and each plantation was more or less self-sufficient.
          We were able to place the meets and bounds of the old surveys on a present-day topographical map because two streams which flow into the Banister River were identified in early deeds and the waterways retain the same name today.  The tract included both Wet Sleeve Creek, which empties into the Banister from the South and Robins Branch, which flows from the north.  Bobby and I walked down an old farm road through a gated pasture probably a quarter or half a mile.  We saw on the topographical map that the old road meandered northwest across the Banister River towards the old courthouse at Callands, which was about four miles away.  For the large county of Pittsylvania County, which from 1767 to 1777 stretched from the present Halifax County line to the Blue Ridge Mountains of the present Patrick County, the glebe land was relatively close to the courthouse. 
          As mentioned above, to the east of the old road, we came to a very old foundation of large rocks.  On the western wall was a large pile of rock which was probably the chimney.  Most of the rocks were imbedded deep in the soil in scattered trees. We knew that old family cemeteries were not far from the house. Looking west up a slight incline on the western side of the road we saw a grove of tall trees, including a tell-tale large cedar, which we immediately suspected to be the family cemetery.  As we approached the grove, we saw tall old tombstones with inscriptions, a fallen down rock wall which was about 18 inches wide and the ever present cemetery periwinkle.

Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

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Danny Ricketts at the base of the cemetery wall.  Note the large tree boxwoods.

Headstone for Martha S. Jones 1830 

Infant daugthter of Thonas S, and Ann R. Calland Jones (died 1830)


Ann Calland Jones died at age 17 in 1830   

        The oldest grave was among the largest tombstones and, with the adjacent stone, told a very sad story.  The inscription: “Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Ann R. Jones, daughter of Samuel and Eliza Calland, wife of Thomas S. Jones, born 24 June 1813 & Died 25 Nov’r 1830.  Age 17 years, 5 months, 1 day.”  The next stone on the north side: “To the memory of Martha S. Jones, Daughter of Thomas S. and Ann R. Jones, born 26 Sep., died 12 Oct. 1830, Age 16 days.”  Thomas S. Jones was born in 1801 and died on 4 June 1853.  When he married Ann on 20 Feb 1827, she was only 14 years old and he was 26.  Thomas was a son of Emanuel Jones of “Mountain Top.”  Thomas S. Jones married again on 24 May 1832.  His second wife was Agnes Morton Watkins, daughter of Benjamin Watkins (1777-1864) and Susannah DuPuy (1786-1864).  They had twelve children. In 1850, Thomas S. Jones was the Sheriff of Pittsylvania County. In 1860, seven years after Thomas S. died, both of Agnes’ parents, who were 83 and 73 years old, were living with her, along with nine of her children ranging in age from eight to twenty two years old. 
         
          Another headstone at the Glebe Tract Cemetery is an “Infant daughter of W.A. and E. A. Dickenson.”  This is another descendant of Samuel Calland (1750-1808).  His son Capt. Samuel Calland’s daughter Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) married Achilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Their daughter Eliza Ann Moorman (b 1826) married William Archer Dickenson and this is their child. 
          A tall headstone with a floral carving is engraved “Thomas C. Moorman Nov. 16, 1793 Feb. 25, 1855.”  Thomas Moorman was an uncle of Achilles Moorman, who married Elizabeth Smith Calland, daughter of Capt. Samuel Calland (1787-1818), 

 

          Another headstone is for “Nancy, wife of Charles Moorman Aug. 6, 1762 Died Feb. 20, 1847.”  Nancy Hancock Moorman (1762-1847) and Charles Moorman (1747-1803) were parents of Archilles Herndon Moorman (1804-1873).  Charles was buried in Hanover County and Archilles on the store tract near the old Callands Courthouse.   

          The last two marked graves are an “Infant son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman May 21, 1844” and William Edwin, son of A. H. and E. S. Moorman, died Mar. 12, 1848.  Age 1 year 5 months 1 day.”  These are children of Achilles Herndon Moorman and his wife Elizabeth Smith Calland Moorman, who are both buried at the family graveyard two miles northwest of Callands.  There are interesting in John Kasey’s journal.  Kasey worked at one of Moorman’s stores.  On Sunday 21st of Feb 1836, he entered: “Nothing new the past week, except Mrs. Moorman being delivered of a fine son 11 ¼ (pounds?).”  Then on the 14th of August of 1836, he wrote: “The 14th, he (Achilles H. Moorman) disinterred a child that had been buried about 12 months and removed it to Mrs. Callands where several of his children are interred.” 
          Only seven graves are identified with headstones. More than half of the rock-walled graveyard here appear to have no markers.  It is possible that some have fallen and sank into the soil.  Capt. Samuel Calland, Junior’s headstone is at Callands with his brothers, who all died relatively young.  It is not clear who lived where.  Capt. Samuel and Elizabeth may have lived on the Glebe property since their daughter and some grandchildren are buried there.  Since, Achilles Moorman buried his children on his mother-in-law’s land; they probably lived with Elizabeth when they married in 1825 before they built a house at Callands near the store.  Elizabeth had been a widow since 1818, when her husband died at age 30, leaving her with five small girls.  Moorman’s wife Elizabeth Smith Calland (1811-1895) was the third generation Elizabeth Calland after her marriage at age 14. 
          A United State Post Office was established at Calland’s Store on April 8, 1803.  Achilles Moorman, who later operated the store founded by his father-in-law, was born the next year on June 24, 1804.  Achilles Moorman was the Postmaster in 1855.  Although the official name of the community was established as Chatham by the General Assembly in 1769, most people called the area Callands because of the store and post office.  In 1777, when Henry County was established, the courthouse was moved to what is now Chatham.  Because of disagreements about the location of the courthouse building’s location, the new county seat was officially named Competition by the legislature in 1807.  Because the old town of Chatham never materialized and the name was never used, the present county seat officially became Chatham in 1874.  In 1767, Pittsylvania County was named for William Pitt, the Earl of Chatham.  In colonial times, William Pitt was instrumental in obtaining a repeal of the dreaded Stamp Act and won the favor of Virginia colonists.  Fort Pitt, which became Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, is named for the same William Pitt.
          In 1758, William Byrd of Westover on the James River, came to this area to lead the Second Regiment of Virginia troops to reclaim Fort Duquesne from the French.  The Fort was renamed Fort Pitt.  Daniel Driskill, one of our ancestors who lived near Bookneal in nearby Campbell County was one of these troops.
          Pittsylvania County was in the forefront of activity during the Revolutionary War.  Many county graveyards have men who served our cause of Independence with a great personal sacrifice.
 
          This old cemetery seems to have been long forgotten, except for a few local residents who call it the old Moorman place.  We were probably the first to visit in quite a long time.  Only the cows come through the tall boxwoods and ramble between the tall tombstones. 
Danny Ricketts Copyright 2008

 

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